Editor’s Remarks

Editor’s Remarks
 
I am pleased to introduce this special issue, guest edited by Robert Shepherd and Kathryn Graham. The guest editors have assembled a number of important contributions for this volume, which provide a legal and epistemological framing for evaluating in Indigenous contexts as well as examples of how this translates into practice. There is still much to learn and to construct in this domain of evaluation, and Shepherd and Graham articulate quite clearly what actions are needed to advance our collective knowledge and practice.
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Peer Reviewers for Volume 34

Peer Reviewers for Volume 34 
 
A.
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Identifying Key Epistemological Challenges Evaluating in Indigenous Contexts: Achieving Bimaadiziwin through Youth Futures

Carleton University
 
Abstract: The evaluation field’s understanding of Indigenous ontologies and epistemologies must improve in ways that do not serve to privilege Western ways of knowing or governmental priorities for accountability. The literature has not identifi ed ways to bridge these in practical ways, or to move the field to balance community and government needs.
English

Evaluation in Indigenous Contexts: An Introduction to Practice

Carleton University
 
SETTING A BETTER DIRECTION FOR EVALUATION IN INDIGENOUS CONTEXTS
 
Indigenous evaluation as a field of inquiry and finding culturally appropriate and responsive ways to evaluate Indigenous programs and services are receiving increased attention (Cram, Tibbetts, & LaFrance, 2018).
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Reflections on Evaluating in Indigenous Contexts: Looking to the Future

Carleton University
 
INTRODUCTION: RECALLING OUR PURPOSE
 
This special edition on evaluation in Indigenous contexts had two purposes: to understand the differences between Indigenous and Western ontologies and epistemologies as these relate to research and evaluation; and to highlight the experiences and insights of researchers and evaluators who work routinely in or with Indigenous communities on research initiatives that incorporate evaluation.
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Reconciliation and Energy Democracy

Kishk Anaquot Health Research
 
Abstract: Indigenous clean-energy leaders are moving Canada’s sustainable development agenda along at an impressive rate and are setting the stage for the localization of goods and services. Indigenous communities that do not yet have enough energy security should be the first recipients of green infrastructure investments in order to bolster equity as a tenet of Canadian nationalism.
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Section 35 Legal Framework: Implications for Evaluation

Carleton University
 
 Abstract: Developments in Canada’s constitutional and legal framework since 1982 set the stage for the current Liberal government’s nation-to-nation policy, which recognizes Indigenous rights and seeks to build a relationship of respect and partnership through reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.
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Indigenous Evaluation in the Northwest Territories: Opportunities and Challenges

Hotıì ts’eeda: NWT SPOR SUPPORT Unit
 
Abstract: There is increasing interest by governments and other service providers in the potential for Indigenous evaluation methods and approaches to support the evaluation of programs and services in a way that is culturally appropriate and responsive. Indigenous governments and organizations are using Indigenous evaluation methods and approaches to inform their own program and service delivery.
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