Editor’s Remarks

Evaluation capacity building (ECB) is a domain of inquiry and practice that has captured the eye and the imagination of many members of our field. Some of our colleagues work as practicing evaluation trainers or have some commitment to capacity building in their evaluation practice. Others have contributed to our understanding of ECB theory through reflective papers and books. And there are colleagues and students of evaluation who have conducted empirical research in the area. Of course, there are also those—the numbers may be small—who engage with all three spheres of interest.

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Understanding Organization Capacity for Evaluation: Synthesis and Integration

The special issue is devoted to the examination of organizational capacity for evaluation and evaluation capacity building (ECB) through empirical inquiry. The compilation consists of two quantitative surveys of evaluators and seven single or multiple case studies across a broad array of organizations in a diverse contexts (e.g., east-central Ontario, California, Hawaii, Minnesota, and Israel). In this final article, the authors look across the collection of studies to identify emerging themes and trends with implications for ECB.

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Using Evaluation Capacity Building (ECB) to Interpret Evaluation Strategy and Practice in the United States National Tobacco Control Program (Ntcp): A Preliminary Study

The Office on Smoking and Health (OSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) supports state programs for the prevention and control of tobacco use through the National Tobacco Control Program (NTCP). OSH provides the NTCP with expert guidance and technical assistance on tobacco use control and disease surveillance as well as evaluation of tobacco control programs. These services fit national health goals and provide data to inform national and state policy making and program planning.

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A Bumpy Journey to Evaluation Capacity: A Case Study of Evaluation Capacity Building in a Private Foundation

Evaluation capacity building (ECB) processes were explored through a case study of the ECB efforts of a private foundation that had solid financial resources, intelligent staff, an internal evaluation officer, and access to prominent evaluation consultants. The overarching research question was: What are the factors that affect the ECB process in an organization? The research design included in-depth interviews, surveys, document analysis, and observations involving a sample of the foundation staff and external consultants.

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Insights into Evaluation Capacity Building: Motivations, Strategies, Outcomes, and Lessons Learned

Evaluation capacity building (ECB) is a topic of great interest to many organizations as they face increasing demands for accountability and evidence-based practices. While many evaluators are engaged in evaluation capacity building activities and processes with a wide variety of organizations, we still know very little about whose capacity is being built, what strategies are being used, and the overall effectiveness of these efforts. To explore these issues, a research study was conducted with 15 organizations that have been involved in ECB efforts during the last few years.

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Informing Evaluation Capacity Building Through Profiling Organizational Capacity for Evaluation: An Empirical Examination of Four Canadian Federal Government Organizations

According to the literature published on the topic, the development of an organization's capacity to do and use evaluation typically follows four stages: traditional evaluation, characterized by externally mandated evaluation activities; awareness and experimentation, during which organizational members learn about evaluation and its benefits by participating in a number of evaluation-related activities; evaluation implementation, the stage at which the role of evaluation is more clearly defined in the organization; and evaluation adoption, which occurs when evaluative inquiry becomes

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Participatory Evaluation as Seen in a Vygotskian Framework

In participatory evaluations of K–12 programs, evaluators develop school faculty's and administrators' evaluation capacity by training them to conduct evaluation tasks and providing consultation while the tasks are conducted. A strong case can be made that the capacity building in these evaluations can be examined using a Vygotskian approach. We conducted participatory evaluations at 9 Hawaii public schools and collected data on the extent to which various factors affected participating school personnel's learning about program evaluation.

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The Road to Evaluation Capacity Building: A Case Study from Israel

We present an empirical case study of an Evaluation Capacity Building (ECB) initiative in a school in Israel. First, we tell the story of the school's 10-year journey toward the successful integration of evaluation through ECB. Then we examine the case according to King's (2002) four elements of ECB: teachers, students, the curriculum, and the context. We present four concrete examples of evaluations conducted at the school illustrating how these elements influenced the results of ECB. We follow this presentation with a discussion of the case in relation to other ECB checklists.

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Evaluation Capacity Building in the Schools: Administrator-Led and Teacher-Led Perspectives

The purpose of this article is to describe evaluation capacity building using an immersion approach in two schools: one with an administrator-led process and one with a teacher-led process. The descriptions delineate conceptual, developmental, and sustainability aspects of capacity building through the perspectives of the teachers, principals, and evaluation specialists.

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Perceptions of Evaluation Capacity Building in the United States: A Descriptive Study of American Evaluation Association Members

This article offers a descriptive picture of American Evaluation Association (AEA) members' attitudes and perceptions related to evaluation capacity building (ECB). For this study, we analyzed data that were originally collected in the spring of 2006 from 1,140 AEA members in the United States on evaluation use.

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