Développement d'un cadre de classement des résultats de la réadaptation pour documenter la progression des clientèles

In the field of rehabilitation, documenting intervention results and the progress of clients is a major concern at all levels, be it clinical, administrative, or scientific. Using new information technologies, it is now possible to meet this challenge by developing an information system capable of taking into account the complexity of the variables involved. To identify those variables, 27 programs representative of the Quebec rehabilitation continuum took part in a study to identify progress indicators in abilities, life habits, and environmental factors.

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Creating logic models using grounded theory: a case example demonstrating a unique approach to logic model development

This article describes, using a case example, the procedure of creating logic models using grounded theory methodology in the context of process evaluation. There currently exists a dearth of literature on the specifics of how logic models should be created. The authors reduce this gap by detailing an integrated methodology they utilized during their recent evaluation of the Youth Educating About Health (YEAH) program. A number of parallels between grounded theory and logic modelling are first discussed to demonstrate their potential for integration.

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Theory-driven approach for facilitation of planning health promotion or other programs

This article revises and extends Chen's (1990) theory-driven framework to address program development. The theory-driven approach to program development is useful for evaluators to facilitate stakeholders in strengthening program plans before implementation. Using this approach, evaluators are able to assist stakeholders in systematically developing a program theory for what they are proposing to do in a program. The theory-driven approach can ensure that crucial components and steps are systematically incorporated into the program plan.

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User-friendly evaluation in community-based projects

There is a growing trend in current evaluation to encourage the active participation of those being evaluated, particularly in community-based programs. This evaluation often focuses on processes as well as outcomes, documenting what has been effective over the life of the project. However, such evaluation is often done "on the run," without thinking through what the evaluation might mean from a user perspective, particularly for clients or project participants.

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Évaluation de l'implantation et des effets d'un programme de soutien intensif offert à des familles afin d'éviter un placement en milieu substitut

This article focuses on the evaluation of a form of intervention with families where there is a risk that a child may be placed in a substitute environment. The program, implemented by the Centre jeunesse de Montréal, was reviewed by evaluators for close to five years. Intervention is characterized by: 1) rapid mobilization of various participants, 2) intensity, and 3) a limited time-frame. Caseworkers are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, generally intervene in the family environment, and provide varied therapeutic and technical support.

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The language of evaluation theory: insights gained from an empirical study of evaluation theory and practice

Broad concern for language issues in evaluation has been limited in comparison to other social science disciplines. In this article, some occasions of definitional or conceptual confusion with evaluation theory language are identified that emerged during a study conducted by Christie. We suggest that much of the language we use to describe evaluation practice is steeped in theoretical terminology, which may limit the utility of the language.

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Evaluation and research: differences and similarities

This article discusses the similarities and dissimilarities between research and evaluation, which are two clearly differentiated disciplines despite their similarity in concepts, tools, and methods. The purpose of research is to enlarge the body of scientific knowledge; the purpose of evaluation is to provide useful feedback to program managers and entrepreneurs. In this article I examine the central characteristics of research and evaluation (validity, generalization, theory and hypotheses, relevance, and causality) and the different roles those characteristics play in each.

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Book reviews

Marisol Estrella (Ed.). (2000). Learning from Change: Issues and Experiences in Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation. Ottawa: International Development Research Centre. 274 pages. (Reviewed by Ronald Mackay)Irving Rootman, Michael Goodstadt, Brian Hyndman, David V. McQueen, Louise Potvin, Jane Springett, & Erio Ziglio (Éds.) (2001). Evaluation in Health Promotion: Principles and Perspectives. WHO Regional Publications, European Series, No. 92, Denmark, 533 pages. (Compte rendu par Nathalie Dubois)

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