Sandra Sellick

Spring

Book Review: Designing Quality Survey Questions.

Authors:
In this textbook, Robinson and Leonard take the reader on a deep dive into
current research and knowledge about best practice, as well as Likert’s foundational
work on scales, to correct common misconceptions about survey design. Th e
book is organized into three sections comprising eight chapters and supported by
a glossary, an appendix, and a comprehensive list of references.
 
 
 

 

 

Spring

Book Review: David M. Fetterman, Liliana Rodríguez-Campos, Ann P. Zukoski, et al. (2018). Collaborative, Participatory, and Empowerment Evaluation: Stakeholder Involvement Approaches. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Authors:
Pages:
3

Stakeholder involvement approaches in evaluation constitute an evolving field. In 1991, Scriven’s Evaluation Thesaurus offered definitions for “stakeholders” and “evaluation” but none for “approaches,” “stakeholder involvement,” or “collaborative, participatory, or empowerment evaluation.” In this new book, Fetterman, Rodríguez-Campos, Zukoski, et al. identify that 20% of American Evaluation Association (AEA) members belonged to the AEA’s Collaborative, Participatory, and Empowerment Topical Interest Group (CPE-TIG), from which this book emerged (pp. vii, 9). With a population of 7,300 members in over 80 countries (American Evaluation Association [AEA], 2018), this is significant.

The underlying research for the book is excellent, with 180 sources: 23% published prior to 2000 and 40% published since 2010. Curiously, only one Canadian Journal of Program Evaluation (CJPE) article reference appears. Does this mean that stakeholder participation approaches have been under-addressed in articles published in this journal? Certainly, Canadian theory and practice are well represented in the body of work by Canadian evaluators such as Chouinard, Cousins, Love, and Shula. Recent evidence of the importance of stakeholder involvement approaches to Canadian evaluators was reflected in the “co-creation” theme of the 2018 Canadian Evaluation Society (CES) conference; 40 presentation titles in the conference program (Canadian Evaluation Society, 2018) reference stakeholder participation, collaboration, and/or empowerment.

Fall

Book Review: Katya Drozdova and Kurt Taylor Gaubatz. (2017). Quantifying the Qualitative: Information Theory for Comparative Case Analysis. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 161 pages. ISBN 978-1-4833-9247-9.

Authors:
Pages:
268-270

Book Review: Katya Drozdova and Kurt Taylor Gaubatz. (2017). Quantifying the Qualitative: Information Theory for Comparative Case Analysis. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 161 pages. ISBN 978-1-4833-9247-9.

Fall

Book Reviews: Trevisan, M. S., & Walser, T. M. (2015) Evaluability assessment: Improving evaluation quality and use. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 181 pages. ISBN 978-1452282442.

Authors:
Pages:
228-230

Book Reviews: Trevisan, M. S., & Walser, T. M. (2015) Evaluability assessment: Improving evaluation quality and use. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 181 pages. ISBN 978-1452282442.

Fall

BOOK REVIEWS: Wyatt Knowlton, L., & Phillips, C. C. (2013). The Logic Model Guidebook: Better Strategies for Great Results (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 170 pages.

Authors:
Pages:
103-105

Fall

(BOOK REVIEW) Program evaluation in practice: Core concepts and examples for discussion and analysis (2nd ed.), D. T. Spaulding

Authors:
Pages:
139-141