Ronald Mackay

Fall

Participatory impact pathways analysis: a practical application of program theory in research-for-development

Authors:
Pages:
127-159

The Challenge Program on Water and Food pursues food security and poverty alleviation through the efforts of some 50 researchfor- development projects. These involve almost 200 organizations working in nine river basins around the world. An approach was developed to enhance the developmental impact of the program through better impact assessment, to provide a framework for monitoring and evaluation, to permit stakeholders to derive strategic and programmatic lessons for future initiatives, and to provide information that can be used to inform public awareness efforts. The approach makes explicit a project's program theory by describing its impact pathways in terms of a logic model and network maps. A narrative combines the logic model and the network maps into a single explanatory account and adds to overall plausibility by explaining the steps in the logic model and the key risks and assumptions. Participatory Impact Pathways Analysis is based on concepts related to program theory drawn from the fields of evaluation, organizational learning, and social network analysis.

Fall

Evaluating Organizational Capacity Development

Authors:
Pages:
121-150

While substantial sums are being invested in the development of organizational and institutional capacities, the design and management of capacity development efforts leaves much to be desired. Few capacity development initiatives have been systematically and thoroughly evaluated. This paper describes the conceptual frameworks and methods used to evaluate a multi-site, regional capacity-development project in Latin America and the Caribbean undertaken to strengthen planning, monitoring and evaluation (PM&E) in agricultural research organizations. The report discusses some of the challenges facing capacity development and its evaluation, outlines the procedures employed, and illustrates these with some consolidated findings in response to four evaluation questions: What were the main contributions of the project to agricultural research management? How were the results achieved? What factors facilitated their achievement? and What lessons can we learn to improve future capacity development efforts and their evaluation?

Spring

Book reviews

Authors:
Pages:
139-146

Marisol Estrella (Ed.). (2000). Learning from Change: Issues and Experiences in Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation. Ottawa: International Development Research Centre. 274 pages. (Reviewed by Ronald Mackay)Irving Rootman, Michael Goodstadt, Brian Hyndman, David V. McQueen, Louise Potvin, Jane Springett, & Erio Ziglio (Éds.) (2001). Evaluation in Health Promotion: Principles and Perspectives. WHO Regional Publications, European Series, No. 92, Denmark, 533 pages. (Compte rendu par Nathalie Dubois)

Fall

The Formative Evaluation of Years 1 And 2 of a Pilot Multicultural/Anti-Racist Educational-Leadership Program

Authors:
Pages:
67-89

This paper describes the evaluation approach, techniques, and instruments adopted during the first two years of a three-year multicultural/antiracist educational leadership program carried out in six different school boards in four Canadian provinces involving approximately 200 secondary students. The purpose of the evaluation during these first two years was primarily to assist the program coordinators, teachers, and students to plan effectively, monitor progress, and fine-tune their training programs in order to more successfully achieve their objectives.

Fall

Assessing the Organizational Impact of Development Cooperation: A Case from Agricultural R&D

Authors:
Pages:
1-28

This paper reports on an evaluation of the organizational impacts of the International Service for National Agricultural Research (ISNAR), a non-profit agency with a mandate to strengthen national agricultural research organizations and systems. For the purposes of this study, "organizational impacts" are defined as the effects of ISNAR's activities and outputs on the external environment, organizational motivation, and capacity of client organizations. The article outlines the context and objectives of the evaluation and the conceptual framework developed for it. A set of component evaluation studies, data collection and analysis procedures and some salient findings are described. Overall results are contrasted with the initial evaluation objectives.