Robert J. Flynn

Special Issue

Validation d'une version française du Outcome Questionnaire et évaluation d'un service de counselling en milieu clinique

Authors:
Pages:
57-74

The first purpose of this study was to assess the psychometric quality and validity of the Mesure d'Impact-45 (MI-45) and the Mesure d'Impact-22 (MI-22), French translations of 45-item and 22-item versions, respectively, of the Outcome Questionnaire (Lambert & Burlingame, 1996a, 1996b). The second purpose was to evaluate, by means of the MI-22, a French-language counselling program located in a clinical setting in Quebec, which provided additional information on the sensitivity to change and clinical utility of the MI-22. Eleven counsellors served a total of 216 clients (80% women) during the period of the study. The MI-22 had good internal consistency (coefficient alpha = .88) and correlated well with a criterion measure, the SCL-10, a short form of the SCL-90-R (Derogatis, 1993). Ninety clients who had taken part in at least 8 counselling sessions made clinically and statistically significant progress. Of 107 clients completing counselling during the study period, 37% recovered, 29% improved, 24% experienced no change in functioning, and 10% deterioriated. Seventy clients who had completed a post-counselling telephone interview expressed a high level of satisfaction with the program, while also making suggestions for service improvement. The MI-22 was seen as useful by both clients and counsellors.

Special Issue

Randomized and quasi-experimental evaluations of program impact in child welfare in Canada: a review

Authors:
Pages:
65-100

Respondents to a recent survey identified the evaluation of service effectiveness as the most pressing priority for child welfare research in Canada. After a comprehensive search, we located and reviewed 10 peer-reviewed impact evaluations, published during 1995–2005, of interventions in Canadian child welfare. Four evaluations were based on randomized controlled trials, and six on non-randomized, quasi-experimental designs. After a critical review of each study, we formulated the implications of the review, for the design and evaluation of child welfare interventions in Canada, in terms of three main needs: for more high-quality impact evaluations; for the evaluation of the effectiveness of a wider range of interventions; and for the implementation and evaluation, in the Canadian context, of interventions of mainly U.S. origin that incorporate the principles of the increasingly influential perspective of evidence-based practice.