Ratsamy Pathammavong

Special Issue

Rigour and Feasibility in Tobacco Control Evaluation: Toward a Successful Reconciliation

Authors:
Pages:
73-87

The challenge of reconciling scientific rigour with feasibility is central to the goals of policy and program evaluation for tobacco control. Evaluations conducted in various settings are held to high standards of performance, and must also be considered feasible by program authorities and stakeholders. This article describes three recent examples from the field of tobacco control. Issues of context, relevance, and stakeholder participation in planning evaluation designs are central to successful reconciliation. To affect tobacco control evaluation positively, reconciliation between the goals of rigour and feasibility needs to occur on two levels: between evaluator and stakeholders, and within the evaluation plan.

Can tobacco control advocacy work be evaluated?

Authors:
Pages:
107-124

Tobacco control advocates have played an important role in Ontario's tobacco control efforts. As with other advocacy work, their efforts have been mostly unexamined. Based on Ontario's tobacco control advocacy work, this article highlights the challenges of evaluating the work of advocates (e.g., having multiple aims, multilayered structures, shifting time frames, measuring longterm goals, dealing with external factors, having goals change at midstream, having different approaches working simultaneously) and summarizes some theories and tools (e.g., Bellwether Methodology, Agenda Setting Theory, Context-in approaches, Pathways of Influence, and logic models) that have been used to conduct effective advocacy evaluations.