Paul R. Brandon

Special Issue

Participatory Evaluation as Seen in a Vygotskian Framework

Authors:
Pages:
103-125

In participatory evaluations of K–12 programs, evaluators develop school faculty's and administrators' evaluation capacity by training them to conduct evaluation tasks and providing consultation while the tasks are conducted. A strong case can be made that the capacity building in these evaluations can be examined using a Vygotskian approach. We conducted participatory evaluations at 9 Hawaii public schools and collected data on the extent to which various factors affected participating school personnel's learning about program evaluation. After the evaluations were completed, a trained interviewer conducted standardized interviews eliciting the participating school personnel's opinions about the methods and effects of the capacity building. Two reviewers used codes representing Vygotskian concepts to categorize the interview results. We present the results of the coding and provide conclusions about the value of using a Vygotskian framework to examine capacity building in participatory evaluations.

Spring

An empirical study of building the evaluation capacity of K–12 site-managed project personnel

Authors:
Pages:
125-141

This article examines the effects of professional development, including formal workshops and ongoing consultation, on the evaluation capacity of K–12 school faculty and administrators who were conducting evaluations of 17 site-managed projects. Changes in the faculty's and administrators' (a) attitudes toward evaluation, (b) self-confidence as evaluators, and (c) assessments of their capabilities as evaluators were examined. School personnel's attitudes toward evaluation did not improve, but their self-confidence as evaluators and their assessment of their evaluation capabilities both showed improvement. The conclusions buttress the argument that, with training and the assistance of experienced evaluators, school personnel can build their evaluation capacity. A number of limitations in study design and data are noted.