Michael P. Shea

Spring

Use of a stakeholder advisory group to facilitate the utilization of evaluation results

Authors:
Pages:
159-162

This article describes the steps taken by the authors to establish a stakeholder advisory group for a major evaluation project. The authors argue that use of the advisory group enhanced utilization of the evaluation project's findings.

Fall

Facilitating Instrumental Utilization for Policy Development in a Multi-Site, Inter-Ministerially Sponsored Human Service Program

Authors:
Pages:
91-106

This article focuses on the instrumental utilization of evaluation findings to assist in the development of program policy, including a brief review of some of the literature in this area. The context from which examples are drawn is an innovative human service program/policy that involves multiple funding ministries and participating agencies. A number of instances of the instrumental utilization of findings from an evaluation of multi-site policy and program implementation are discussed. In addition, evaluation practices that served to enhance utilization are presented, including pre-evaluation activities, activities that occurred during the course of the evaluation, and activities performed after delivery of the final report.

Spring

Extent of Evaluation Activity and Evaluation Utilization of CES Members

Authors:
Pages:
79-88

This article reports surveys results obtained from 69.3% of the Canadian Evaluation Society (CES) members listed in the 1988 membership directory. Only 310 (58.4%) of the 530 survey respondents had completed a Canadian program evaluation in the years 1985 through 1987. Of those who had completed an evaluation during this period, 11.3% were unaware of how their results had been utilized. The remaining 275 CES members supplied data oil the extent of their evaluation activity that demonstrated high variability between CES members and revealed that a minority were full-time evaluators. Data on the extent of utilization showed extensive conceptual, instrumental, and persuasive utilization.

Spring

Issues in the Measurement of Integrated Service Delivery in Human Services

Authors:
Pages:
1-14

This article discusses measurement issues that arise when evaluators attempt to assess the meaning and extent of integrated service delivery in human services programs. Service integration is a concept that is currently enjoying a major revival. Current social policy directions (especially on the part of the Ontario government) reflect a renewed will to implement integrated service delivery models in human service programs and organizations. Earlier work, from the mid 1970s through the early 1980s, on measuring this slippery aspect of organizational and program functioning is now being reexamined, revised, and updated. Lessons learned from evaluating an inter-ministerially sponsored children's' services program in Ontario are presented here. Evaluation issues explored in this article include recommended procedures for measuring program stakeholders' visions of "ideal" integration as well as their views of the extent of "real" service integration in functioning programs and on how and why to compare "ideal" to "real" human service integration.