Keiko Kuji-Shikatani

Spring

Evaluation in the Provinces and Territories: A Cross- Canada Snapshot and Call to Action

Authors:
Abstract:
Evidence-based decision-making and managing for results are terms oft en heard from politicians and senior government offi cials at both federal and provincial levels of government in Canada. But, while there is some level of under- standing at the federal level in terms of the role and use of evaluation in measuring results, there is significantly less information readily available about the extent to which evaluation is being used at other levels of government. This paper provides a cross-Canada synopsis on the capacity and use of systematic evaluation at the provincial and territorial levels of government. Authors from nine provinces and two territories provide a succinct analysis of the extent to which evaluation is being used in their provincial/territorial government, as well as a description of the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead for evaluation. There is a paucity of published information on this subject, but the paper uses research conducted in 2001 as a benchmark to compare the state of aff airs for evaluation within provincial/territorial governments. With limited progress over the past two decades, the paper offers an overview of findings and some proposed actions for the way ahead.
 

 

Special Issue

Evaluator Competencies: The Canadian Experience

Authors:
Pages:
29-47

This article examines the development and adoption of competencies1 in Canada, created as a key foundation of the Credentialed Evaluator designation under the auspices of the Canadian Evaluation Society (CES). Following a brief description of the Canadian evaluation context and issues that led to the competencies' development, this article reviews the development process. The approved Competencies for Canadian Evaluation Practice are presented with concluding comments on the future of competencies in Canada.

Fall

Preparing school evaluators: Hiroshima pilot test of the Japan Evaluation Society’s accreditation project

Authors:
Pages:
125-155

This article reports on the efforts of the Japan Evaluation Society (JES), in collaboration with the Canadian Evaluation Society, to develop and pilot test an accreditation and certification scheme for school evaluators. The purpose of the JES accreditation model is to support evaluation capacity building and promote high quality evaluation by developing functional evaluation competencies. The article describes the theory and practice of the JES approach to evaluation training and accreditation, including its overall rationale, the influence of Japan's socio-political context, the content of the school evaluator training program, and the findings of the initial "test of concept" pilot test in Hiroshima. Based on a six-month follow-up evaluation, the article also provides an assessment of the acceptance, early results, and potential sustainability of the evaluator training program. These findings have encouraged the JES to establish the accreditation scheme for school evaluation, followed by a similar system for the evaluation of international development assistance programs and government policy evaluation. The development of the JES accreditation scheme should be of interest to other evaluation societies and also to public/nonprofit organizations that must use brief training courses or evaluation "toolkits" for building evaluation competencies quickly among staff.

Special Issue

Introduction to Professionalization of Evaluation in Canada / Introduction à la professionnalisation de l'évaluation au Canada

Authors:
Pages:
v-xv

(no abstract available)

Launching the Credentialed Evaluator (CE) Designation

Authors:
Pages:
70-85

How do you make a professional designation program happen within one year? What resources, processes, systems, and structures are required? This article describes how the Canadian Evaluation Society (CES) implemented its national Credentialed Evaluator (CE) program through the dedication of volunteer members of the CES. The interdisciplinary nature of evaluation practice shaped the development of systems, policy, administrative procedures, governance, and management for the credentialing process. Consideration of political issues and communication with the stakeholder community were essential to the credibility of the implementation process.