Courtney Amo

Spring

Reconnecting knowledge utilization and evaluation utilization domains of inquiry

Authors:
Pages:
81-85

This article provides commentary for the thematic segment titled "Applying a variety of methods to the evaluation of various efforts aimed at transferring knowledge generated from research." The authors revisit arguments supporting inquiry that takes up the challenge of connecting cognate fields of evaluation utilization and the broader domain of knowledge utilization. The central contribution of each of the foregoing articles is identified and situated within the context of ongoing inquiry in this domain.

Special Issue

Organizational Capacity to Do and Use Evaluation: Results of a Pan-Canadian Survey of Evaluators

Authors:
Pages:
1-35

Despite increasing interest in the integration of evaluative inquiry into organizational functions and culture, the availability of empirical research addressing organizational capacity building to do and use evaluation is limited. This exploratory descriptive survey of internal evaluators in Canada asked about evaluation capacity building in the context of organizational characteristics (learning, support structures), evaluative activity and use, and variables that mediate use. We received a total of 340 usable responses to an online survey. This article provides a descriptive account of the findings with a cursory look at differences across respondent role, organization type, and self-reported perceived level of evaluation knowledge. Results showed a pattern of moderately high ratings of organizational learning and support functions, the extent to which evaluation is being conducted and used, and stakeholder involvement in evaluation. Some differences across respondent roles, organization type, and evaluation knowledge were observed. Results are discussed in terms of an agenda for future inquiry.

Spring

Conceptualizing research impact: the case of education research

Authors:
Pages:
75-98

This qualitative study aims at conceptualizing research impact generally by studying the specific case of research impact in the field of education. An analysis process akin to grounded theory was applied to the analysis of sections of reports provided by educational researchers. Literature on the subject of research impact was used to substantiate and complete the portrait of educational research impact that emerged from the data. The resulting conceptual framework proposes five interdependent stages, each one characteristic of certain categories of research impact that are typically interrelated in time and in terms of researcher control. It is hoped that this conceptual framework will help program evaluators and researchers tackle the larger task of uncovering and arguing the meaningfulness of alternative ways of measuring the impacts of research in the social sciences and humanities.