Catherine Worthington

Special Issue

Patient satisfaction with health care: recent theoretical developments and implications for evaluation practice

Authors:
Pages:
41-63

Using client or patient satisfaction instruments to assess the quality of services and programs is an integral component of much program research and evaluation. But however methodologically straightforward and programmatically useful, the constructs and theory underlying patient or client satisfaction measures are not particularly simple, and the informativeness and usefulness of these satisfaction measures have been repeatedly called into question. To help program evaluators more effectively incorporate service users' perspectives into program evaluations, this article reviews major approaches to, and research on, satisfaction theory, including disconfirmation, fulfillment and consumer models, and sociological perspectives, and discusses emerging approaches and implications for evaluation practice.

Spring

Empowerment Evaluation: Understanding the Theory Behind the Framework

Authors:
Pages:
1-28

This article describes empowerment evaluation and reviews its adequacy as an evaluation model. The author shows that empowerment evaluation, as developed thus far, is very broad in scope and vague in detail. It is underdeveloped in many areas, including its orientation to knowledge building (epistemology), values, appropriate programmatic context and use, and some areas of method. More work needs to be done to clarify and improve the empowerment evaluation technique if it is to become a stronger model.