Arun S. Roy

Fall

Effectiveness of UI Non-Compliance Detection

Authors:
Pages:
21-34

This article reports on the different methods of investigation employed to detect noncompliance with UI regulations, and their relative effectiveness. It considers a previous evaluation of the Unemployment Insurance Program for which a national random sample of UI claimants was selected from the active claimload and referred to Investigation and Control Officers for in-depth enhanced investigations. Results of these investigations, along with details of the specific control and investigation activities, were reported for analysis. A variety of investigation methods were generally combined, which meant that these were inter-correlated, making it difficult to apply standard regression analysis. Instead, principal components method is used for grouping of variables, and these are then entered into a logit regression model.

Spring

Are immigrants more dependent upon the unemployment insurance program than native-born Canadians?

Authors:
Pages:
45-63

This study addresses the question of whether immigrants in general and relatively recent cohorts of immigrants in particular use the unemployment insurance program more extensively than native-born Canadians. For analytical purposes two databases — microdata from the 1981 and 1991 censuses — are merged. Multivariate logit regression analysis shows that after all factors are controlled for, immigrants in general had a lower probability of using UI than Canadians. When immigrants are disaggregated by cohort, ectric tests show that the cohort effects apparent in the raw dat are not statistically significant. All immigrants in general also received smaller amounts of UI dollar benefits than native-born Canadians.

Fall

Insurance claimants working while on claim

Authors:
Pages:
71-86

Subject to certain restrictions, the Canadian unemployment insurance ( UI ) system permits insurance benefit recipients to work and supplement the UI benefits. Although this provision relating to the treatment of earnings during the benefit period under the UI (now called EI) Act had been in operation for many years, hardly anything is known about the extent to which this provision is utilised and what impact this has had on their UI benefit period. The main objective of the provision during the benefit period is to encourage UI claimants to maintain some linkage with the job market so that their re-employment is facilitated. The empirical analysis presented here confirms that the UI benefit period of insurance claimants working while on claim is substantially shorter than that of others who do not work while on claim.