Anita M. Myers

Spring

Reflections on the CES Case Competition: The Coaches' Perspective

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Pages:
113-118

Fall

Coming Tto Grips with Changing Canadian Health Care Organizations: Challenges for Evaluation

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Pages:
127-148

Canadian health care organizations are in the midst of' rapid change. Reduced federal transfer payments have necessitated radical cost containment measures, including megers reconstructing downsizing, and outsourcing. At the same time, health care organizations are undergoing a transition in approach to management and accreditation, from quality assurance (QA) to continuous quality improvement (CQI). This article describes that transition, examines the status quo of evaluation activities in both QA-based and CQI-based organizations, and discusses some of the opportunities and challenges facing evaluators in the health care sector.

Spring

Evaluation of the Hartmobile Health Promotion Program

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Pages:
19-29

There is an increasing demand for the evaluation of expenditure and regulatory measures undertaken by the European Union in order to improve accountability and achieve "value for money" objectives. At the most general level, the task of organizing evaluation systems for these programs falls to the European Commission. Historically, the commission has focused on developing policies rather than monitoring or delivering them. With the maturing of certain policy areas, the commission's role is shifting in the direction of review and evaluation. From a systemic point of view, the management of EU policy presents particularly severe challenges in the area of evaluation. There are multiple actors located at local, national, and supranational levels; divergent administrative cultures and practices; variable quality of information, records, and capabilities; an attenuated system of reporting; and unclear lines of accountability. Joint funding of some programs creates additional problems by entangling program impacts and the audit purposes and management of national and EU institutions, respectively. The commission has still to come to a view on the parameters defining commonality and diversity in evaluation. In order to improve the situation, the commission has taken a number of initiatives, among them the setting up of an expert working group on the evaluation process. This article reports, in general terms, the findings of that group for 1994–95.

Fall

Evaluation Principles in Practice

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Pages:
23-35

Since all programs operate within an organizational setting, the utility of evaluation activities can be enhanced by considering an organization's structure, evaluation readiness, and the related functions of evaluators. This article focuses on the application of a set of complementary principles derived from the evaluation literature using three projects as case studies. Two of the projects involved large Canadian health-related organizations, while the third focused on the evaluation needs of a medium-size social service agency. The diversity of these projects attests to the general relevance of principles derived from the systems model, the evaluation capability model, and the evaluator as consultant approach.

Fall

Needs Assessment: Broadening The Perspective On Its Utility And Timing

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Pages:
103-113

Needs assessment, a tool for program planning, involves collecting data from service agencies, key informants, and potential clients, and drawing inferences from indicators of community needs. As portrayed in the literature, this approach to evaluation should only be used prior to program development. Both the utility and the timing of the needs assessment approach have been restricted by this portrayal, as case studies will illustrate. Needs assessments should be conducted not only in the initial planning stage but periodically after a program has been implemented. In conjunction with formative evaluations, periodic needs assessments can be useful in the on-going process of program modification and in planning for future services delivery.