Alan G. Ryan

Fall

All Pulling Together: Working Toward a Successful Evaluation

Authors:
Pages:
131-150

Utilization of results is an important aspect of program evaluation. Naturalistic methods aim at increasing the utilization of research findings by providing stakeholders with a rich understanding of the situation being studied. In this article, we report on a study that caused us to examine the assumption of the power of naturalistic methods. We found that one key to utilization is to narrow the gap between the type of information provided by the study and the expectations of the stakeholders.

Spring

Through the Looking Glass: What Happens when an Evaluator's Program is Evaluated

Authors:
Pages:
87-116

This paper reports on an occasion where the author, an experienced evaluator, became the client of an evaluation. This reversal led the author to reflect on the role of the client in an evaluation. The article records the thoughts and impressions of a client as his program was being evaluated. The discussion section focuses on the roles and obligations of, respectively, the client and the evaluator.

Special Issue

Editor's Introduction: Educational Evaluation at the Turn of the Millenium

Authors:
Pages:
1-2

Spring

Tensions In Trans-cultural Native Education Programs: Hurdles For The Sensitive Ealuator

Authors:
Pages:
69-79

Trans-cultural native education programs are defined as those which are designed to prepare members of these minority groups to function in the majority culture. These programs operate under a number of tensions of constraints which must be considered during program evaluations. In this paper several tensions which arose during the evaluations of three programs are examined and discussed in the light of what is currently known about cross-cultural evaluations.

Fall

Professionalism And School-Based Program Evaluation

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Pages:
63-75

Participating in program evaluations is a new part of the classroom teacher's role. If teachers are to embrace the opportunities provided by this participation, they need to understand the process of program evaluation and to appreciate its potential to empower them in their professional lives. This article discusses these issues in the context of Saskatchewan's current curriculum change and offers an illustration of one instance where participating in a proper evaluation study did enhance the professionalism of a teacher.

Fourth-Generation Evaluation

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Pages:
77-91

Naturalistic program evaluation strategies are gaining acceptance within the evaluation profession. They are especially useful in the examination of the transaction, or process, components of programs. One of their disadvantages is that they demand extensive quantities of evaluator time and effort which are difficult to arrange. Guba refers to evaluation conducted within the naturalistic paradigm (as distinct from the use of naturalistic techniques) as fourth-generation evaluation. This article describes an evaluation study in the health field that attempted to stay within the naturalistic paradigm while mitigating some of the drawbacks of the methodological process of naturalistic evaluation.

Fall

School Systems' Views Of Accountability Through Program Evaluation: A Case Example

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Pages:
81-96

In a time of increasing demands for accountability, school systems are considering how program evaluation can meet their accountability needs. This article examines how some urban and rural Saskatchewan school systems are defining the role of program evaluation. It interprets those views in terms of extrinsically, intrinsically, and ambivalently motivated accountability and discusses the findings within the context of the recently released report of the Minister's Advisory Committee on Evaluation and Monitoring.